Employment Law Blog

News, trends and analysis in employment law and HR

Jan 27, 2015

Paid sick leave is on the horizon across the nation

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In his State of the Union address earlier this week, President Obama supported a trend that we’ve seen growing on the West Coast for the past several years: mandated paid sick leave for employees.

In his State of the Union address earlier this week, President Obama supported a trend that we’ve seen growing on the West Coast for the past several years: mandated paid sick leave for employees. While this concept has been discussed in the past, with little political traction, the current landscape seems different than in previous years. Within Vigilant’s service area, we have already seen a trend towards paid sick leave laws. The state of California and the cities of San Francisco, San Diego, Seattle, Portland and Eugene have all passed laws mandating that employers pay sick leave, and Tacoma may be joining the list soon. In Oregon, we anticipate legislation will be introduced during the upcoming legislative session, seeking to make Oregon the fourth state in the nation to mandate paid sick leave. According to Associated Oregon Industries, the House Business and Labor Committee is already working on the bill. With President Obama’s proposal to offer more than $2 billion in federal assistance for states who adopt paid sick leave laws, it’s likely that other states will see similar bills introduced.

It’s too early to speculate how this movement will play out , but employers should start thinking about adjustments that may need to be made if this issue gains further traction. Vigilant will keep you informed as developments occur and can help you implement the appropriate requirements for your city and/or state. Our attorneys can help you identify options, strategize the best approach for your business, and revise policies to meet both your business needs and the legal requirements. To learn what laws apply to your business, call your Vigilant employment attorney for further discussion.

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