Employment Law Blog

News, trends and analysis in employment law and HR

Oct 07, 2014

WASHINGTON: L&I announces 2015 workers’ comp rate increase

Wage and HourWorkers’ Comp 

Washington’s Department of Labor and Industries (L&I) has announced an average proposed 1.8 percent rate increase in workers’ compensation rates effective January 1, 2015, pointing out that the proposal is just under the current rate of wage inflation of 2 percent.

Washington’s Department of Labor and Industries (L&I) has announced an average proposed 1.8 percent rate increase in workers’ compensation rates effective January 1, 2015, pointing out that the proposal is just under the current rate of wage inflation of 2 percent. Yet, Oregon just announced a 5.3 percent decrease in next year’s base premium rate, consistent with the nationwide trend in decreasing premiums. The indicated rate to break even in Washington is a 3 to 4 percent decrease in premiums. The Department is using the additional funds to build an adequate contingency reserve that they believe will provide protection for employers and workers against future large rate fluctuations.

Tips: The proposed rate is an average. An individual employer’s actual rate change may be more or less depending on its own experience and the experience of its industry. For example: the rate for sawmills is decreasing by 1 percent while wood products manufacturing in general is going up by 5 percent; similarly, metal goods manufacturing is increasing by 1 percent while aircraft manufacturing is decreasing by 1 percent. Additional information about the proposed rate increase and specific industry classification rates can be found on the L&I website at www.Rates.Lni.wa.gov.

People can comment at the public hearings listed in the agency’s press release or in writing to Jo Anne Attwood, administrative regulations analyst, P. O. Box 41448, Olympia, WA 98504-4148; or email joanne.attwood@Lni.wa.gov. All comments must be received by 5 p.m., Nov. 3, 2014.  If you have any questions, email Trish Leimbach or Nancy Dicus or call them at 800-733-8620.

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