Employment Law Blog

News, trends and analysis in employment law and HR

Jan 09, 2015

Revised OSHA reporting in effect; remember to display OSHA-300A summary Feb-April

Safety and Health 

As we previously reported, January 1, 2015, is the effective date for new rules requiring OSHA-covered employers to notify the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) of in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, or loss of an eye within 24 hours of learning of a work-related injury.

As we previously reported, January 1, 2015, is the effective date for new rules requiring OSHA-covered employers to notify the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) of in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, or loss of an eye within 24 hours of learning of a work-related injury. Fatalities must still be reported within 8 hours. Employers will be able to report electronically once the agency finishes work on its web portal, which currently just provides a telephone reporting option.

The January 1, 2015, effective date applies to employers in states such as Idaho and Montana which are under the direct jurisdiction of OSHA. States such as California, Oregon, and Washington, which have their own reporting rules, will have up to six months to ensure they are at least as stringent as the federal rules. For information on reporting requirements in your state, see our Legal Guide, “Catastrophe/Fatality Notification Procedure”.

In addition to these new reporting requirements, most employers must continue to log work-related injuries and illnesses on the OSHA-300 log, and post the OSHA 300A summary of incidents from the past calendar year from February 1 through April 30. In Idaho, Montana, and Washington, you should use the federal OSHA 300A summary. California and Oregon have their own versions. Questions about OSHA reporting or recordkeeping? Talk to your Vigilant safety professional. Also, check out the BLR Safety resources available to members through the Vigilant member website. BLR’s collection of resources on injury and illness recordkeeping includes trainers’ guides, quizzes, and handouts to help with your compliance efforts.

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