Employment Law Blog

News, trends and analysis in employment law and HR

Showing all recent posts

Photo of Matt Norris
Oct 08 2019
 

WARN Act notice required for employment loss, not temporary layoff

An employer wasn’t required to give workers 60 days’ notice of a layoff lasting fewer than 6 months since the layoff wasn’t an “employment loss” under the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (WARN Act), according to a recent court decision. Under the WARN Act, an employer must give at least 60 days’ notice in the event…

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Photo of Kandis Sells
Oct 08 2019
 

Q&A: Duty to keep health insurance during workers’ comp is limited

Question: We have an employee out on leave to recover from a workplace injury. Are we supposed to keep her on our health insurance plan?   Answer: It depends on whether the employee’s leave is protected by federal or state leave laws in addition to workers’ compensation. State workers’ comp laws generally don’t require employers to…

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Photo of Jackie Marks
Oct 08 2019
 

Employer pays $58K penalty after teen’s death

A Georgia company was found in violation of federal child labor laws prohibiting hazardous occupations for minors when it employed a 15-year-old to operate a power-driven weed cutter. Sadly, the teen drowned while cutting brush along a river. During its investigation, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) also found the…

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Photo of Karen Davis
Sep 25 2019
Wage and Hour  

EEOC doesn’t intend to seek pay & hours data for 2019 or beyond

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) says it needs time to analyze the 2017 and 2018 data on worker pay and hours it’s currently collecting, and therefore doesn’t intend to ask for such data in future years. The agency has also come to the conclusion that it grossly underestimated the amount of…

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Photo of Karen Davis
Sep 25 2019
Safety and Health  

Employer sentenced after welder’s death

In the aftermath of a welder’s death on the job, an oilfield company pled guilty to a willful violation of federal safety standards requiring tanks to be cleaned before welding. The welder was 28 years old and had recently moved to North Dakota to work in the oil industry after serving in…

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Photo of Lorraine Hoffman
Sep 20 2019
Wage and Hour  

Q&A: Directly sharing wages with other companies is illegal

Question: Our plant manager asked the managers of the other operations in our business park to share what they’re paying for forklift operators and what they’re planning for wage increases this year. He’d like to make sure that we remain competitive; is his informal survey of these local companies okay?   Answer: Absolutely not! Antitrust laws…

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Photo of Jodi Slavik
Sep 18 2019
Webinar  

Webinar: Washington Paid Family & Medical Leave 10/29/19

WHAT EMPLOYERS NEED TO KNOW   Tuesday, October 29, 2019 10-11 a.m. Pacific / 1-2 p.m. Eastern   Starting on January 1, 2020, your employees will be able to apply for Washington Paid Family and Medical Leave benefits. Are you ready? If not, you’re not alone. The law created a lot questions. And, the rules released by the…

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Photo of Kandis Sells
Sep 11 2019
Termination & Resignation  

Supervisor in Washington may be individually liable for termination

In Washington, an employee may bring a legal claim against an individual supervisor who participated in an employment termination decision, according to a federal district court. A former middle school principal brought a claim for wrongful discharge in violation of public policy against both the school district and the individual…

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Photo of Jodi Slavik
Sep 11 2019
 

Q&A: Don’t use lie detectors to investigate theft

Question: Our petty cash has been disappearing lately. There are three employees with access to the cash drawer. Can we use lie detectors as long as we test all three?   Answer: No, that’s not enough to justify such a test. Although you’re attempting to be non-discriminatory in testing everyone, using lie detectors on employees is…

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Photo of Lorraine Hoffman
Sep 11 2019
DisabilityHarassment & DiscriminationTermination & Resignation  

Balancing competing employee interests can be tricky

An employer in Missouri is finding out the hard way that balancing the competing rights of employees can be complicated. In this case, a coworker with Tourette’s syndrome regularly and repeatedly shouted racial slurs at an African American employee. The employer tried to separate the workers so they didn’t have to work…

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